Thursday, January 15, 2009

Lesson 47: Independent Clause vs Dependent Clause

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Review: You've learned that a Clause is a group of words which contains a subject and a predicate. It is usually considered a part of a sentence; but when it is capable of standing alone, it is equivalent to a simple sentence. Now you will learn the 2 main kinds of clause: the Independent Clause and Dependent Clause.


An Independent Clause expresses a complete thought and can stand alone in a sentence.

  • JUSTIN DELIVERS PAPERS before he comes to school. (The clause Justin delivers papers could stand alone, for it expresses a complete thought.)
  • I GIVE YOU THIS so that I can say goodbye. ( The clause I give you this could stand alone, for it expresses a complete thought.)

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A Dependent Clause on the other hand, does not make sense when standing alone.

  • Robert delivers papers BEFORE HE COMES TO SCHOOL. ( The clause before he comes to school does not make complete sense when standing alone; it is dependent upon other words to give it a complete meaning.)
  • I give you this SO THAT I CAN SAY GOODBYE. ( The clause so that I can say goodbye does not make complete sense when standing alone; it is dependent upon other words to give it a complete meaning.)


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Other examples of an independent clause:

  • You report to me.
  • You tell me.
  • I kiss my mother.
  • We sing the song.
  • They played and laughed.
...and many more



Other examples of a dependent clause:

  • who painted the scenery
  • where they stored the goods
  • that he succeeded
  • when the wind blew
  • If she had been delayed
... and many more



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As said, the dependent clause has three 3 subtypes:

a.) Noun Clause
b.) Adjective Clause
c.) Adverb Clause


These will be discussed in the next lessons.




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~end of lesson~

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