Saturday, January 17, 2009

Lesson 54: Varying Sentence Beginnings

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If every sentence in a paragraph were a simple sentence, then the paragraph would be repititive and elementary. The same problem occurs if all sentences within a paragraph have the same basic structure, for example, Subject-Verb order (S-V-O). However, you can easily vary your sentences by altering the traditional order.


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Here are several types of beginning that will keep your sentence interesting:


1. A prepositional phrase - You can start your sentence by using a prepositional phrase.

  • Through your help I was able to move on with life.
  • In three to four years, you'll have your money back.


2. An infinitive phrase - You can start your sentence by using an infinitive phrase.

  • To reach his goals, Justin must practice writing everyday.
  • To love you, I need to love myself first.


3. A participial phrase - You can start your sentence by using a participial phrase.

  • Playing all afternoon, the children are now tired.
  • Ignoring you all day, I now found myself full of regrets.


4. A direct object - You can start your sentence by using a direct object.

  • The cake, I gave to my boyfriend.
  • The letter, I read it to to you.


5. A dependent clause - You can start your sentence by using a dependent clause.

  • Although I love you, I still need to leave.
  • By doing it, Justin is now happy.


6. An adverb - You can start your sentence by using an adverb.

  • Happily, Justin did it.
  • Immediately, I ran to his house.


7. An adjective - You can start your sentence by using an adjective.

  • Being beautiful, my sister walked down the streets.
  • So terrified, Justin ran to me.


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~end of lesson~

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